Eddie S. Winn In Healthcare

Water Conservation Tips (toilets surely included)

How we try to reduce water usage from our toilets

Due to warmer temperatures in the summer, droughts and depleting water supply will likely become more common Worldwide. The water crisis in rural areas every summer highlights the need for better urban planning and management.

When the Convenient Height company was born and the 20 inch toilet was first produced, we were (actually still are, surprisingly) one of a very few toilet manufacturers to offer the Dual Flush functionality with every toilet we produce. Our engineering also allows us to have one of industry’s smallest water tanks – while not sacrificing the flush. It is possible to have a great flushing toilet while at the same time also saving water.

More than 35 billion gallons of fresh water are used to flush toilets each day, or nearly six times the daily water consumption of Africa. With millions around the world facing severe water scarcity, we hope that reducing the amount of water used for flushing could help to alleviate some of the problem.

1994 WAS THE year that federally mandated low-flow shower heads, faucets, and toilets started to appear on the scene in significant numbers. How can you conform to the standards and help increase energy efficiency in your home? Information here is based on article from nationalgeographic.com. We believe in water conservation and are passionate about it. Anything you could do to save a gallon or two per day, will make you feel better. It will make our Planet Earth feel better.

WHAT’S YOUR WATER FOOTPRINT? Let’s find out at https://www.watercalculator.org/

Water Conservation At Home

  • On average, 10 gallons per day of your water footprint (or 14% of your indoor use) is lost to leaks. Short of installing new water-efficient fixtures, one of the easiest, most effective ways to cut your footprint is by repairing leaky faucets and toilets.
  • If you use a low-flow showerhead, you can save 15 gallons of water during a 10-minute shower.
  • Every time you shave minutes off your use of hot water, you also save energy and keep dollars in your pocket.
  • It takes about 70 gallons of water to fill a bathtub, so showers are generally the more water-efficient way to bathe.
  • All of those flushes can add up to nearly 20 gallons a day down the toilet. If you still have a standard toilet, which uses close to 3.5 gallons a flush, you can save by retrofitting or filling your tank with something that will displace some of that water, such as a brick.
  • Most front-loading washing machines are energy- and water-efficient, using just over 20 gallons a load, while most top-loading machines, unless they are energy-efficient, use 40 gallons per load.
  • Nearly 22% of indoor home water use comes from doing laundry. Save water by making sure to adjust the settings on your machine to the proper load size.
  • Dishwashing is a relatively small part of your water footprint—less than 2% of indoor use—but there are always ways to conserve. Using a machine is actually more water efficient than hand washing, especially if you run full loads.
  • Energy Star dishwashers use about 4 gallons of water per load, and even standard machines use only about 6 gallons. Hand washing generally uses about 20 gallons of water each time.

The climate crisis is forcing us to drastically rethink our toilets. Here at the Convenient Height Co. we try to have a little bit of an impact.

Yards and Pools

  • Nearly 60% of a person’s household water footprint can go toward lawn and garden maintenance.
  • Climate counts—where you live plays a role in how much water you use, especially when it comes to tending to a yard.
  • The average pool takes 22,000 gallons of water to fill, and if you don’t cover it, hundreds of gallons of water per month can be lost due to evaporation.
  • The water it takes to produce the average American diet alone—approximately 1,000 gallons per person per day—is more than the global average water footprint of 900 gallons per person per day for diet, household use, transportation, energy, and the consumption of material goods.
  • That quarter pounder is worth more than 30 average American showers. One of the easiest ways to slim your water footprint is to eat less meat and dairy. Another way is to choose grass-fed, rather than grain-fed, since it can take a lot of water to grow corn and other feed crops.
  • A serving of poultry costs about 90 gallons of water to produce. There are also water costs embedded in the transportation of food (gasoline costs water to make). So, consider how far your food has to travel, and buy local to cut your water footprint.
  • Pork costs water to produce, and traditional pork production—to make your sausage, bacon, and chops—has also been the cause of some water pollution, as pig waste runs into local water sources.
  • A cup of coffee takes 55 gallons of water to make, with most of that H2O used to grow the coffee beans.

Transportation

  • The water footprint of your per-day electricity use is based on state averages. If you use alternative energies such as wind and solar, your footprint could be less. (The use of biofuels, however, if they are heavily irrigated, could be another story.) You would also get points, or a footprint reduction, for using energy-star appliances and taking other energy-efficiency measures.
  • Washing a car uses about 150 gallons of water, so by washing less frequently you can cut back your water use.
  • A gallon of gasoline takes nearly 13 gallons of water to produce. Combine your errands, car pool to work, or take public transportation to reduce both your energy and water use.
  • Flying from Los Angeles to San Francisco, about 700 miles round-trip, could cost you more than 9,000 gallons of water, or enough for almost 2,000 average dishwasher loads.
  • A cross-country airplane trip (about 6,000 miles) could be worth more than 1,700 standard toilet flushes.
  • Traveling from Chicago to Istanbul is just about 10,000 miles round trip, costing enough water to run electricity in the average American home for one person for more than five years.

Convenient Height Co. toilets are here to offer at least one way to make it easier for our Customers to reduce the daily water use as it relates to toilets. And if we all work together on this we can make sure the World continues to get the water it needs.

Water Crisis Africa

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